Many new writers find that writing for children's magazines is a good way to break into the children's market. However, some writers -- especially writers who don't care much for reading magazines -- don't care for the magazine market and prefer writing books. While writing for magazines is never a prerequisite for writing and publishing books, it is certainly one way to break into the market, and can provide experience in working for editors. Fiction Did you like reading short stories when you were a child? Did you love getting magazines in the mail? Can you still remember some of the stories you read? If so, you might find your niche in writing short stories for magazines. Magazine fiction, like all children's fiction, needs to be lively, original, and well-grounded in the child's world. In general younger the child you are writing for, the more real the story needs to seem. Very young children like stories about the things they're

most familiar with: mealtime, bath, bedtime, going to the library, playing with friends. A story about losing a favorite toy at the grocery store and finding it again under the vegetable bins can be an exciting adventure for a toddler. A story showing another child or animals in their bedtime routine can be a soothing read for a child who is getting ready for bed. These stories may or may not be written in rhyme, but they should have a cadence and rhythm to them. If you want to write for toddlers, read magazines geared for toddlers, such as Babybug. Think about your own experiences at that age. How did you view the world? What was important to you? What were your fears? Jot down these ideas and compare your ideas to what you see in the magazines. How could you turn these ideas into short stories? Five-to-seven-year-olds are learning to read, and need stories that they can read with…