How many times have you opened an auction in Ebay and been put off by a poor auction description? Lots of times I'll bet. The auction description, especially on Ebay, is a fundamental part of achieving a successful sale. If the description isn't right, no amount of pictures or repricing will get your item sold. So where do people go wrong? Firstly, make sure the standard of your writing is good. Ensure your spelling is always correct and that you write in clear, concise sentences. There is a tendency these days for people to write phrases to get their point across because 'people will know what I mean'. This couldn't be further from the truth. When parting with hard cash for any item, people want to know exactly what they are getting for their money. If you have not been clear or are relying on hinting at something, a potential buyer will just look elsewhere, rather than be bothered to

even ask you the question. So what does this tell you about the level of content you need to supply in your description? You need to supply as much information as possible without swamping the buyer in a sea of text and pictures. This is why your writing needs to be concise. You need to ensure that you get across the maximum amount of information in the shortest possible number of words. To illustrate the point, how many times have you seen an auction, or even a website that takes a full five or ten seconds to scroll down through. Ask yourself now, how many of those auctions or websites did you actually bother to read all the way through? The chances are that it's none, isn't it? From a practical point of view, you need to supply a good, accurate description of what it is you're selling. Your facts need to be correct at all times. If you are…

Copyright is an important issue that all writers need to familiarise themselves with, for their own protection. Copyright applies to many different forms of creativity, but we are primarily interested here in how it applies to written works: also referred to as literary works. Copyright is a form of legal protection for the creator of a written literary work. In general, it affords the creator exclusive rights to (or rights to authorise someone else to): reproduce the work derive new work based upon the original distribute, sell, rent, lease or lend copies of the work perform the work (in the case of theatrical plays, screenplays, songs etc). It is therefore generally an infringement of the copyright of a literary work to do any of these things (and more) without the written permission of the copyright owner. In this case, copyright applies to 'original' written works. This may include books, novels, instruction manuals, song lyrics or even newspaper articles. Copyright does not apply

to names, slogans, titles or individual phrases. These may, however, be trademarked, which is different to copyrighting. The United Kingdom Patent Office defines an 'original' work: "A work can only be original if it is the result of independent creative effort. It will not be original if it has been copied from something that already exists. If it is similar to something that already exists but there has been no copying from the existing work either directly or indirectly, then it may be original." The USA has similar definitions which should be checked if more relevant to you. All countries have their own similar but subtly different copyright laws and you should check the one most applicable to you. Although you are free to assert your copyright ownership on your own original works by using the familiar © symbol, the year of creation and your name, it is also advisable to register the work in your name to ensure…

There can be fewer more embarassing things as a writer, than to realise that something you have written and published contains a glaring error. It's especially embarassing when it's a simple mistake or if it makes you look stupid. One of the greatest pitfalls, and sources and of potential embarassment, is when you get a figure of speech wrong, either through ignorance or just through a plain old typo. How many times have you seen an e-mail, or heard someone speak, and realised that what they've said doesn't look or sound just quite right. In everyday speech we use metaphors, euphemisms and sayings that can be misheard or misconstrued by anyone who isn't familiar with them already. In writing, the situation is just the same; only with a more embarassing effect for the writer. When you're writing or editing your work, think of phrases or sayings that you may have used. Think whether you've used them or expressed them correctly.

While the meaning or sound of the expression may be fine in your head, has it translated onto paper correctly? To illustrate the point, think about these phrases: batting down the hatches v batten down the hatches damp squid v damp squib mute point v moot point adverse to v averse to auger well v augur well alterior motive v ulterior motive barred wire v barbed wire butt naked v buck naked on tenderhooks v on tenterhooks one foul swoop v one fell swoop short shift v short shrift In each case the first one shown is incorrect, the second one is the real phrase. Would you have known this? The reason that many people have difficulty with them is because most of them are homophonic, that is, they sound the same or very similar. Most people will not be able to tell you the origin of some of these well-used phrases but most will readily understand what you are…

Once you have determined the subject of your article, you can write the title to the article. Now one thing is really important when determining the title of your article. The title of your article must be exactly related to what the article is going to address. If is it is not directly related to the subject matter of the article, then people who click into the article to read about the title’s subject, and find that you have written about something else, will click out of your article and you will lose trust with them. One thing that is incredibly important online is that you must be extremely credible in everything that you do. It is hard enough for someone to trust you online, when they cannot see you or visit you in person; if you do deceptive things like create flashy titles just to get people to open your article, but they are

not accurate to the nature of the article, you will lose people’s trust and they will not buy from you. Although I do not spend a lot of time trying to optimize things for the search engines, when I do have an easy opportunity to do it, I often will. So when you write your article title, try to put the main keyword phrase for which you want your article to be ranked, in the first few words. Then, you can write a statement that answers the question or problem you are going to solve in your article. For example, this might be a good title: Puppy Dogs – How to Choose the Right Puppy Dog For Your Pet Or: Dog Training – How to Teach Your Dog New Tricks Of course, once you have written your article title, it is important that you stick to the topic of your title as you write the article.

With more and more writers using the internet as a source of information and facts, it has become imperative to ensure that what you read, use or cite is actually accurate. Few things can be more embarrassing for a writer than being told that the information you've based your writing upon is flawed. The internet can be a risky place to look for information these days. Despite there being many excellent, authoritative and reliable sites that writers can use with confidence, there is an even larger number of sites with little or no credentials whatsoever. These need to be treated with a degree of scepticism. Blogging has seen a significant rise in the number of sites and accessible pages purporting to be giving us the truth, the bare facts or that elusive scoop story. In truth, the writers of these blogs, in the majority of cases, will have no more authoritative sources or knowledge on the subject than you or

I might have. Many blog pages have been created for the vanity of the blogger himself or simply as a platform for advertising revenue, making the quality and accuracy of the content less important to the website owner. Looking further afield, sites like Wikipedia, while being excellent sources of detail and background information should also, and possibly suprisingly, be treated with a note of caution. While Wikipedia appears to be a very authoritative source and is fast becoming the definitive look-up encyclopedia of the web, we need to remember how it is produced and maintained. Anyone can edit a page on Wikipedia. You must therefore look to verify anything you read wherever possible. You will see though, that Wikipedia can sometimes show pages as being in need of proof of claims or or requiring verification. The site is somewhat self-regulated, but anyone can still provide content. In recent times, it has been common practice to look for corroboration of facts…

A lack of confidence in your own writing can be quite common when you first start writing professionally, and can still occasionally hit even the most hardened pro. As with writer's block, writing confidently is as much to do with your state of mind as your ability; there are techniques that can help relax your writing anxiety and help you compose words in a flowing, lucid manner. Here are ten ways of learning to write more confidently, because writing should be a pleasure and not just a profession: 1) Read a lot. Read widely in new genres and formats, and not just within your own area of expertise. Seeing how other authors formulate their paragraphs and project meaning will help formulate structures in your own mind. The more widely you can read the more expansive your points of reference and the influences you can draw on when you sit down to put pen to paper. 2) Write a

lot. The more you write the more you'll relax, and agonize less over every sentence. Write even if your not getting paid for it. Start a blog, write articles for free distribution or write for a charity. Rekindle the feeling of writing for pleasure and remind yourself why you choose to do it in the first place. 3) Overcome your fear of people reading your work. If you're not yet yet writing professionally, share your writing with friends or post it on writing community websites. Stage fright at the thought of exposing your words to others can often hold back many from taking the jump into the professional arena. The fear of criticism of what you've poured out onto the page has to be conquered if you want your talent to be appreciated. 4) Understand why you want to be a writer or why you became one. Was it from friends enjoying your short stories, work colleagues commenting on your writing or…

How many times have you trawled the web, looking for information only to find an article that looks like it was written by a four-year old child? With the rise of article marketing as a proven strategy for promoting websites and increasing traffic, there has been an explosion in the number of article-based websites and articles available. In many cases, however, this rise in the quantity of available web content has been at the expense of quality. There are a great many articles that are not providing the kind of positive promotion that webmasters are looking for. This is because the need to create backlinks is the primary reason for the article but also in part due to the poor standard of the writing in general. If you are writing an article to promote your business or website, you need to remember that the creation of a backlink is not the only reason for the article. You must ensure your

article shows you in a positive and professional light. Poorly written prose, badly constructed sentences and incorrect spelling will annoy your readers. They will serve only to detract from the image that you wish to portray. Readers will know if it was written in a hurry. Mistakes in your articles tell your potential customers that you didn't check them, and so that is the kind of service they can expect from you. Whether this is actually true or not is immaterial. That's the impression you give when you publish a badly written article. There are some simple things you can do to avoid this. Proofread your article. Never write an article and immediately submit it. Leave at least 30 minutes between finishing your draft and proofreading it. This ensures your mind has had a chance to focus on something else and that you've mentally 'dumped' the article content from your mind. You will have a better chance of finding errors…